Happy National Girl Scout Leader’s Day!

By Marketing Specialist – Asia Hebert

Did you know that April 22 is National Girl Scout Leader’s Day? This special holiday is a Girl Scout tradition that has been around for years. While we appreciate everything our volunteers do every day of the year, we want to take this particular day to give you an extra pat on the back for all that you do.

We know that your involvement with Girl Scouts takes time, dedication, and commitment. We hope that with all the hard work it takes to be an outstanding Girl Scout leader that you see the results in the girls you lead. Without you, Girl Scouts would not be able to grow into the go-getters, innovators, risk-takers and leaders that the world needs. So when times get tough and you’re bogged down with paperwork, keep your head up and know that you are making a difference in the lives of girls!

Need some inspiration on how to show your appreciation for the Girl Scout leaders in your life? Check out these tips:

  • Have your Girl Scouts plan a special day or event to thank their Girl Scout leaders for all their hard work.
  • Make a craft or handmade gift that your Girl Scout leader will appreciate and remember this day by.
  • Write a thank you note. Whether it’s an e-mail or handwritten letter, let the Girl Scout leaders in your life know how they have changed your life for the better.
  • Share your appreciation on social media. Post a graphic, share a story or just say thank you! Tag your Girl Scout leader and hashtag #NVW2017 (National Volunteer Week 2017).
  • Buy her a gift she’ll remember you by. You can shop online on GSUSA’s shop  with free shipping until April 24 or visit one of our shops in Lafayette or Shreveport to use our 20% off coupon!

Have a story you would like to share about a Girl Scout volunteer? Be sure to send it our way!

Generations of Girl Scouts

by Troop Support Specialist – Kim Lee Harris & Troop 593 Leader – Jamie Frost

Thank you to Jamie Frost, volunteer & troop leader of Troop 593 of West Monroe for writing and sharing her story of generations of Girls Scouts in her family!

As long as I can remember, my family has been involved with Girl Scouts. The tradition started with my great grandmother, Helen Houghton, who was a troop leader in the 1930 and 1940s. My mother was both a Girl Scout and leader for about 15 years. My father is an honorary life time Girl Scout and made many contributions to our troop growing up. My two sisters and I grew up as Girl Scouts in my mother’s troop. Now the tradition continues with me leading my daughter in Troop 593.

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Growing Up as a Girl Scout 

Growing up in a house full of Girl Scouts and Girl Scout activities was very fulfilling. I have many fond memories of visiting the Silver Waters council with my mom. We were a very active troop and my parents took an initiative to help in numerous ways. It seems like just yesterday that I was sitting at Pinewood singing Girl Scout songs or participating in flag ceremonies. My father helped build many things at Pinewood and I can remember seeing my grandfather’s name on a plaque at Pinewood for his contributions. My father helped build the educational nature center as well as making all the nature learning tools at Pinewood. While I don’t remember a whole lot about our regular troop meetings I do recall going through great lengths to plan and prepare for meetings, investiture ceremonies, and bridging. I remember the incredible friendships, adventures, and leadership skills that we took away from Girl Scouts. As I got older I was able to participate in two great programs – Pathfinders and a Wider-Op to Michigan. I believe these opportunities helped shape me into the strong woman I am today.

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Leading the Next Generation

In 2007 I had my little girl Kaylee and hoped that she would participate in Girl Scouts. When Kaylee started Kindergarten, she brought home the girl scout flyer and I was over the moon. I was still in school but wanted her to be involved with a troop. I wanted my daughter to have the same experiences that I had as a child. I knew that if I wanted her to have the true Girl Scout experience I needed to start my own troop. I finished school, found an incredible co-leader, and decided this year to start my own troop. I can’t say it’s always been easy but it has given me so many rewards that I never imagined. I learn new things every week from these incredible, strong, sweet girls.

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I hope that I am instilling a long tradition of Girl Scout leaders not only with my daughter but others as well. I want them to know they can do anything if they put their mind to it!

Girl Scout Volunteers – Desire to Inspire!

By Katherine Stagg – Troop Support Specialist

A young girl once asked me, “Why do you have boy toys in your car?” The question caught me by surprise. The robots in my car were for girls and had only been used by girls, yet in her mind they were for boys. When I explained this to the young inquisitive girl, she was pleased with the answer, however she did not express interest in them. Her specialty was gardening and selling her plants to make money. She explained to me her business plan: location, employees, business hours, schedule, etc. Although she was only six years old and unable to fully create business plan, the ideas were there.

According to the Girl Scout Leadership Institute, Louisiana is ranked 48th in girls who struggle with life issues.  Girl Scouting can make a difference in a girl’s life and change the trajectory of where our state is headed for young female leaders. I share this to inspire volunteers to be on the watch for our future nursery owners, future robot programmers, future dance stars and know that you are making a difference in their lives. You and your volunteer team are offering opportunities for girls to stretch their imagination, thoughts, and ideas. Listen and be there to support them. The way you listen to a girl today will have an impact on your future as well as hers. She will make a difference. I know this because my former Girl Scouts from when I was a leader are making that difference. Today these girls are teachers, cake decorators, nurses, mothers, journalists, advocates, doctors, security guards, etc.

What is the young girl mentioned above doing today? She is now eight years old, still in school and a Girl Scout. She still has some years left to build upon her dream and see it realized. We will have to wait and see what comes of her plans but I believe with the help and guidance of volunteers like you, she will see her dreams come true.

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Keep up the tradition of becoming a Girl Scout volunteer and inspire others to make a difference too. Inspire your girls, let them think, let them experience, and let them dream. You are building memories; memories for them…….and for you too.